PhD self-care tips

PhD self-care tips

Working in the world of academia as a PhD student can be very demanding. We don’t get awarded the title of Dr for simply generating some good data or coming up with an awesome idea, we work hard to earn that PhD. Hard work comes with stresses and sometimes a few road bumps along the way.

One thing a lot of us can forget is that all important self-care. A PhD is like an endurance event, it’s a long and rewarding journey, but we need to take care of ourselves to get to the finish line.

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So how can we look after ourselves? Here are my top 10 PhD self-care tips:

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Stop comparing yourself to others

You may start your PhD the same time as other students but everyone’s PhD is different. Comparing yourself to others on occasion can be a healthy kick up the backside if you’re slacking. But trust me, for the most part it’s unhealthy and causes unnecessary stress and unhappiness. Focus on you and your PhD.

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Need help? Ask!

Whether you need help with a protocol or you’re having a few struggles with mental wellbeing, seek help. We all need help at times no matter how big or small the problem is, and there is a wealth of support out there for you. Know the right people to ask for help in the lab, find out what support services your university provides, and read blogs to help with issues related to the PhD life.

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Don’t just live for the weekend

Looking after yourself is not just for the weekends. Working 12-hour days during the week with those fun things left to the weekend is going to lead to burnout. Be honest with yourself, how productive are you after the normal 8/9 hour working day? Probably not very. So take time for you in the evenings, whether that’s just relaxing, going to the gym or seeing friends. Living for the weekend can lead to you associating the week with negative thoughts, that’s not exactly a great way to live.

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Emails. You don’t have to be attached 24/7.

Does your phone notify you as soon as you get a work email? If yes, I really suggest turning them off. Having them on means you never have a true break from work and in some situations this can lead to anxiety. Also, try not to check emails fist thing. Checking emails as soon as you get to work can lead you off track from your original plan for that day. Try opening them up a couple hours into work so you start your day off well. Are they really so important that they can’t wait a few hours?

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Sleep well, exercise regularly and eat right.

Being mindful of the foundations to leading a healthy life (mentally and physically) is so important. Getting those 7-9 hours sleep improves brain function. Regular exercise keeps you fit, allows you to focus on something non-work related and is a great stress reliever. Eating a balanced diet and not relying on sugar to keep you awake whilst working gives your brain and body the right fuel to function well. Being and feeling healthy helps to keep a positive mindset.

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Be organised

The deeper into the PhD journey you get, the more studies you’re juggling and the more items you have on that to-do list. Being organised is key to keeping yourself on track, focussed and motivated. These all lead to reductions in stress levels. Set short terms goals. I advise making daily goals at the start of the week or the day before and tick them off as you go along. Small steps make big progress.

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Play to your strengths

PhDs come with a degree of flexibility in how you work. If you are most productive in the morning, then start and end your working day earlier. Maximise that time you work well. If you aren’t a good multitasker then set aside blocks of time in your week to do your research, reading and the other odd jobs. There’s no point trying to tackle everything in one day if you know your brain doesn’t function like that!

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It’s ok to say no

You can’t take on everything your supervisor and others want you to. Saying yes to everything will lead to burnout. Be aware of the work you can take on without compromising your work/life balance. Developing this awareness does take time but it allows you to then manage the expectations you have of yourself, and enables you to manage your supervisor’s expectations of you.  

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Celebrate successes

We work hard so reward yourself when you’ve reached a goal. Allowing yourself treats will help you to stay motivated. For the smaller goals treat yourself to something little like your favourite dinner, and for the bigger milestones reward yourself something super fun like a trip to the pub/cocktail bar or a day trip to the beach.

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Time off

Remember we are entitled to time off, everyone needs a break. Taking time off helps us to relax, unwind and gives that overworked brain some nice relax time. It helps us to come back to work energised and proactive. If a certain phase of laboratory work means it’s hard to take a whole week off, make sure you’re planning in some long weekends.

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Are you mindful of putting self-care into practice? Any other tips you can enlighten us all with? As always, I love to hear from you! Just comment below.

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[ I originally wrote this blog post as a guest contributor for Let’s Talk Academia. Check the website out here! It’s full of brilliant advice and experiences about life as a postgraduate student and working in academia. ]

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The power of mentoring – Stemettes & MonsterConfidence

The power of mentoring – Stemettes & MonsterConfidence

It’s National Mentoring Day tomorrow, a day to recognise the importance and benefits of mentoring, whether that’s being a mentor or being a mentee.

One of my aspirations is to inspire the younger generation to pursue a career in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). I was fortunate enough to be part of the amazing MonsterConfidence event here in Southampton with Stemettes a couple of weeks ago.

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Who are Stemettes?

STEMETTES 'Monster Confidence' @ Southampton  - ©Paparazzi VIP Photography

Stemettes is a social enterprise who aim to empower young women to consider a career in STEM. They do this by introducing these ladies to amazing women who are already working and succeeding in the field. Stemettes organise many events throughout the year ranging from panel events to “hackathons” to the MonsterConfidence tour.

“Women only make 21% of the core STEM workforce.”

Wise Campaign

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They’re doing a fantastic job at accomplishing their mission. Just under 15,000 young women have attended their events, and a whopping 95% of attendees have increased interest in STEM after just one Stemettes event.

So! If you’re a young women aged 15-22 in the UK and Ireland, and would like a boost in confidence and become more informed in what the world of STEM has to offer you, then check out their upcoming events!

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Mentoring at MonsterConfidence

Head Stemette Anne-Marie has set up the MonsterConfidence tour to provide confidence, inspiration and guidance for girls and young women who may want to get involved in the world of STEM, or are unsure whether it’s the right path for them.

Just under 100 young women attended the Southampton event which was full of inspirational talks, interview practice, mentoring, career workshops and meeting people in industry. It was a fun day full of energy, encouragement and of course food!

STEMETTES 'Monster Confidence' @ Southampton  - ©Paparazzi VIP Photography

As a speed mentor I spoke to young girls one-to-one for a speedy 6 minutes a time. I was there to act as a listener, a source of support and an advisor. We discussed my journey, what they liked at school, what they struggle with and where their next steps in education might be. I was there to answer all the different questions they had and it was great to talk to a wide variety of students. Some knew their career direction already, some had an idea of potential options, but many students felt unsure. A few of the girls I spoke to said how much the event had inspired them which is fantastic. One girl even said a talk in the morning had inspired her to look into a completely different area of STEM! That just proves the power these type of events can have.

STEMETTES 'Monster Confidence' @ Southampton  - ©Paparazzi VIP Photography

I was also given the opportunity to do a lightening talk at the end of the day. I spoke about my experiences from school (and how I thought I was always going to go into graphic design) to my PhD in physiology and current aspirations to be a science communicator.

“Many expressed an improved perception, awareness *and* confidence in STEM careers.” 

Stemettes

 

Despite being there as a mentor, even I got a little bit of mentoring! Dr. Jen Gupta, an astrophysicist by day, a comedian and presenter by night shared her journey with us, how you can have more than one passion, and how you can have confidence in what you do.

The event ended with the attendees taking part in a Soapbox challenge where they shared what they had learnt from the day. They showed confidence and they showed that they were mindful about their future. It was incredible to see what they had learnt, and truly proved that Stemettes is doing a brilliant job.

STEMETTES 'Monster Confidence' @ Southampton  - ©Paparazzi VIP Photography

I never had opportunity like this when I was at school. Looking back, I only really had the guidance of school teachers and my parents. Don’t get me wrong, that was great. I went to a great school and my parents were supportive of my choices, but there is so much more support out there now. No matter whether you want to pursue the STEM route, or go another direction there really is a wealth of support out there for you. Seek it out!

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Once this PhD is finished and I have a little more free time, I aim to carry on being involved with mentoring events like this for young people in STEM.

Stemettes – hopefully I can become one of your Sherpas in the not too distant future?!

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Follow Stemettes on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and check out their website!

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Scientist turned comedian – My Bright Club experience

Scientist turned comedian – My Bright Club experience

Since I’ve been blogging and exploring the world of science communication, I never expected to do some of the things I’ve done. Nearly a month ago I performed my first stand-up comedy set. Who would have thought it!

The event was called Bright Club. It’s where researchers become comedians for the evening, something I never imagined I’d be part of, other than in the audience! One of the organisers approached me through my blog and asked if I’d be up for performing. My heart skipped a few beats as I read the message but in a moment of pure madness, I thought I’d be brave and accepted. 

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September 9th: Training session

The reality that I was actually going to attempt comedy on stage hit. We had our first training session. This was a great opportunity to ask questions, get some tips and to meet the other performers. At this point we were two weeks out. I had two weeks to make a script, and most importantly, make it funny. No pressure.

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Brainstorming ideas

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September 16th: Rehearsals

With one week to go it was rehearsal time. In my head the jokes I planned to say were funny, but were they to other people?! Thankfully I got some laughs which put me at ease. We all shared tips on how to improve the content/wording of our sets so I came away with some worthwhile changes. It was definitely a boost for us all. So a few tweaks, and time to practice with my pretend microphone.

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September 22nd: The day of Bright Club Southampton #9

At 5.30pm we all rocked up at the venue to do a mic test and settle down for the evening. Not going to lie, the nerves started to kick in!

After the first researcher performed, I was second to take to the stage. My set was titled “A PhD: The trials & tribulations“. I spoke about my research, the moment I was asked to perform, my failings in trying to inspire the younger generation and what being cooped up alone in the lab for 18 hours a day does to you. I wrapped the set up with my top 5 tips for surviving a PhD. They may not be tips you were expecting, you’ll just have to click the image below and watch it for yourself to find out!

My set

My jokes were well received and getting the first lot of laughs calmed my nerves. My aim was to get one laugh and I accomplished that, so I was one happy girl. The audience were fantastic, and I had lots of support from my friends who came to watch. Of course the event attracted other researchers, but what was awesome is that many members of the audience were outside the world of STEM from all sorts of career backgrounds. People’s friends and partners came to watch, and members of the public got involved too.

I signed up to something totally out of my comfort zone, I put myself out there, I accomplished the task, and celebrated with a gin. Happy days.

Can science and comedy go hand-in-hand? Could comedy be a useful tool in engaging more of the public with research? Would you consider giving stand-up comedy a go?

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All the other researchers did an awesome job talking about climate change to being a stem cell detective, from the internet to embracing your weird identity! You can watch their sets by heading over to Bright Club Southampton YouTube channel, as well as all previous performances. Keep up-to-date on upcoming performances and new podcast episodes by following the Bright Club Southampton Facebook page.

Thank you to Nikhil and Dave from Bright Club Southampton for asking me to perform, it was a fantastic experience!

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PhDs, academia and mental health

PhDs, academia and mental health

It’s October 10th, and it’s World Mental Health Day.

It therefore seemed like a good time to talk about PhDs, the world of academia and mental health. It’s a topic that is commonly overlooked, yet so important to have awareness of.

Embarking on a PhD is exciting, they come with amazing opportunities and you’ll be an expert in your research field by the end of it. You’re the creator of knowledge and have the ability to share it with the world. How awesome is that? A PhD can take 3-7 years depending where you are in the world. Yes, it’s a long journey. Kind of like an endurance event – a lot of people go through the motions, you get the highs and you get the lows.

Everyone’s PhD journey is different, there are many factors which dictate how easy/hard the ride will be. For some it can be a very isolating experience and research shows a high proportion of students struggle with mental health, from anxiety to clinical depression.

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Self Reflected in Violets - Greg A Dunn Design
Self Reflected in Violets – Greg A Dunn Design

We don’t often like to talk about our struggles in life. We don’t want to appear weak to others. We want people to see the good aspects of our lives. Sometimes we may struggle mentally but we don’t want to even admit that to ourselves because the realisation is a scary one. It’s a taboo subject for sure.

There’s a culture of acceptance around mental health issues in the world of academia. This acceptance needs to be broken down. Why should people suffer in their job? Since when was that ok? Of course a PhD is difficult, it’s the highest qualification a person can get, and we don’t expect an easy ride but the common view “A PhD is supposed to be hard” is not ok. There’s a difference between a journey being challenging and a journey where struggling mentally is accepted as that’s just the norm.

Over the last few years, people have started to speak out more, which is fantastic. Sharing experiences can help others in the same position a great deal as it helps them to relate to another person.

 

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What research says:

A study in Belgium, published earlier this year in the journal Research Policy, investigated the prevalence of mental health problems in 3,659 PhD students. Here’s what they found:

  • 51% experience psychological distress
  • 32% experience common psychiatric disorders.
  • The prevalence of mental health problems is higher in PhD students than in other highly educated populations.

The main causes include: work-family conflict, work overload, unrealistic demands, unsupportive supervisors, interpersonal problems at work and sleep deprivation as a result of worrying about work.

A report in the USA also revealed that between 42% and 48% of University of California science and engineering PhD students are depressed.

Both studies add to the literature surrounding academia and mental health, and emphasises the need to put policies in place to support the issue.

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“Universities should adopt mental health as a strategic priority, implementing a whole university approach, with students and staff involved at all stages of the journey.” – Universities UK

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So what can you do for you?

IG tip #14

 

Self-care – Remember your mental and physical wellbeing is a priority, look after you! Fellow bloggers (dr.ofwhat? and Heidi R Gardner) have written blog posts about self-care so go and check those out!

Have a nose at my blog posts – I share advice on various aspects linked to the PhD life in my PhD SOS feature, from how to get out of the PhD slump, to easy ways to add exercise into your busy schedule, to getting your focus and motivation back – check them out!

Talk about your feelings – Whether that’s to family/friends/partner or a mentor. A mentor can be hugely useful. Seek out what support services your University provides. Talking about your struggles may help you understand your feelings a bit more, and that self-awareness might help you to push for change.

Be proactive in creating change – Talk to relevant charities, work with your university. Help to increase awareness of the issue and help to break these acceptances down. Perhaps you could promote wellbeing and mindfulness sessions within your university?

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Please remember:

  • You are not alone, there’s a wealth of support out there.
  • You can have a social life as well as get a PhD.
  • It is not ok to work yourself to the point of illness.
  • It is not ok for academics to encourage this behaviour.
  • Asking for help is not a weakness, seek help and try to put advice into practice.

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Healthy foundations: Making time to exercise

Healthy foundations: Making time to exercise

Regular exercise and staying fit is so important to living a healthy life, but how often do you exercise? Since starting my blog and sharing my science journey through Instagram, it’s made me aware of how many people rarely get that heart rate up – and yes grad school students, I’m looking at you!

Too much to do, too little time right? I’m going to be that devil on your shoulder and say, sorry, you can always find time! I know people don’t like to hear that, but bare with me…

In this blog post we’ll explore the positive effects of exercise and I’ll be dishing out some tips to help you get more fitness into your busy schedule.

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The wonders of exercise…

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Improves brain function

Studies have found that exercise helps to improve learning and memory. Physical activity leads to an increase in the expression of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in areas of the brain including the hippocampus (brain centre for memory). It is known to support the growth of new neurones, neural survival and synaptic plasticity. Exercise also stimulates other growth factors which promote the growth of brain cells and slows down age-related decline. If you want to nerd-out, read more about exercise and the brain in this review article.

Fun fact: Different exercises have different mental gains!

Ulitmate brain workout
Image: New Scientist

 

Positive mindset

Exercise can alleviate stress by stimulating the release of that feel-good molecule serotonin and other endorphins. They essentially act as natural painkillers which in turn improve our mood and mental health. Exercise also helps us to sleep better, consequently lowering those stress levels.

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Movement/mobility

Daily desk job workers – how does your body feel when you’re sat down most of the working day? After a while, probably not fantastic. Having good mobility is required to perform everyday activities. Developing bad postural habits and limiting your joint mobility is not going to do you any favours! Staying active and regular stretching will really help to prevent mobility issues in the future.

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Lowers disease risk

Exercise is great for our general health! It improves our muscular, cardiorespiratory, and bone health. It lowers the risk of developing complications such as high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, heart attacks, obesity and type-II diabetes. Weight training strengthens our muscles and helps to maintain our muscle mass. This is important as it slows down the rate of decline in muscle mass and strength that we experience as we get older (sarcopenia) leading to falls and fractures.

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My top tips to get fitness into your routine:

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Schedule in exercise time!

Just like you plan your work and social plans, schedule in the time to exercise as well. Planning when you’re going to go for a run or lift those weights in the gym will help you to focus on work beforehand and create more of a balance.

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Start small, build it up.

If you’re new to this whole exercise thing, then don’t go all out to start with! We want it to be a shift in mindset – a new lifestyle choice rather than a phase. Maybe just start off by exercising two/three days a week and gradually build it up.

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Ditch the car, cycle.

Cycling is a great way to get from A to B. You don’t get stuck in the traffic, you’ve exercised before the day has really begun, and you’re helping the environment. Triple win.

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Get some extra steps.

Take the longer route to work. Cut the time you spend in the coffee room for lunch and finish it with a 15-minute walk. If walking isn’t something you usually enjoy, try combining it with listening to a podcast or audiobook you like. Make it fun!

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Find fitness you enjoy!

Hate running but love exercise classes? Then choose the classes! Exercise should be enjoyable. It’s your “me” time so make the most of it and don’t make this part of your day harder for yourself.

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Make it part of your social time

Join a sociable form of exercise, like crossfit or a team sport. Alternatively, get a friend to go with you on that run/walk/fitness class. Exercise can be a social event too! Plus, it keeps you accountable to someone else.

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Create fitness goals

Like I said, we want exercise to become a habit and not a temporary love affair. It’s good to have focusses on other things than work. Whether it’s signing up for a 5k run, climbing up a mountain, getting that 100kg deadlift, set a couple of goals and work towards them. It will keep that motivation to stay fit.

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Are you taking enough time out of your week to stay active? How do you like to stay fit and healthy? As always, please comment below as I love to hear from you…

To read the first in my “Healthy foundations” mini-series all about sleep, click here.

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The PhD slump

The PhD slump

Everyone’s PhD is different and we all go through highs and lows. What I call ‘the PhD slump’ is that period many of us experience where we severely struggle with motivation, focus, belief in ourselves and passion for what we’re doing. Being in this negative phase is tough, and something numerous people I know (as well as myself) have been through.

I’d say it’s most common when students are halfway into their PhD. They start to question “will I have enough data to get this PhD?” and “will I be able to get it all done in the remaining time?”. An unsupportive supervisory team also makes it harder and some may experience the PhD slump due to burnout.

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PhD Comics

I share my experiences and advice on my Instagram account where I strive to give an honest and real feel about the PhD journey. Recently numerous people have reached out to me through social media and in person asking for help with their struggles, so what better time to share some tips…

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My 10 top tips:


1. Acceptance

Accepting you are going through a tough phase weirdly helps to relax into it. It will help you to gain some perspective on your situation. Having this self-awareness enables you to help yourself and find ways to work your way out of it.

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2. Asking for help is a strength, not a weakness

Friends and family are wonderful, but also seek out support from your university. What support systems do they have in place? Is there a mentoring scheme where you can chat to another academic in confidence? Having an outside perspective who understands the academic system can be really useful. If you can speak to your supervisor about your troubles, then great! Having an open and honest conversation can take a big weight off your shoulders.

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3. Focus on each day at a time

Set daily goals. Tick them off one-by-one. This will help you be productive and in turn become more motivated. It’s all about the positive feedback loop! It may take time, and it might be tough, but stick at it.

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4. Do little things you love to stay positive

Balance out those daily tasks with rewards. It makes the working day that little bit easier. Self-care is especially important during this time, so make sure you treat yourself whether that’s with a glass of bubbles, watching your favourite movie or chilling with friends.

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5. Exercise, sleep and eat well

Mental and physical health is so important. Be mindful of the fundamentals in leading a healthy life. Getting enough sleep, exercising regularly and eating the right food helps us to be more positive and productive.

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6. Manage those expectations of yourself

So you’re finding things tough right now? Don’t expect yourself to be able to work like crazy! Don’t even put that pressure on yourself. Understand you, what you feel like each day, what you can realistically get done, and go back to point #3, plan each day to as you feel.

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7. Don’t panic, think logically

Too much work, not enough time? Don’t panic, it’s not constructive! Make a list of your top priorities, your secondary priorities, and the less important ones. Plan when you’ll get the top priorities done and fit the others around them if realistically possible. Remember, a thesis is barely ever a finished story.

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8. Stay accountable

When you’re in a rubbish phase, self-motivation is a lot harder. Let a friend know your work goal that day or week so you are accountable to someone. I recommend setting a weekly meeting with your supervisor(s) so you can discuss your plan and you don’t go off track.

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9. Time out

We all need time off, especially if you are feeling burnt out. Take a break to go on holiday or even a long weekend. Like I said, it’s all about the self-care. It will help you to recuperate, get some energy back and give you that motivation to push out of this PhD slump.

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10. Keep going!

I know this isn’t what people like to hear, but put all of these points into practice and really try to stick at them. Little steps each day make big progress and will really help you to feel much more positive about your PhD and your day-to-day life!

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Exploring Iceland after submitting my upgrade thesis

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Are you in this slump right now? Have you been in it and climbed back out? What tips do you have to go from being negative about your PhD to positive? As always, please share your thoughts in the comments below.

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Making it Mindful: Dr. Chrissy Jones

Making it Mindful: Dr. Chrissy Jones

Since starting my blog I’ve interacted with so many other inspiring scientists, and I want to share their amazing journeys in STEM with you guys. I’m therefore thrilled to introduce my new feature – Scientist Showcase!

For the very first feature we have the beautiful Chrissy behind the Making it Mindful blog. I absolutely love what she writes about, in fact she was one of my nominees for the Versatile Blogger Award, so naturally I’m super excited to introduce you to her!

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Chrissy is a lecturer in Pharmacy Practice and research associate at The University of Manchester. She studied Psychology for her undergrad and masters degree, and during this time was introduced to the world of pharmacy through training to be a pharmacy dispenser. This all lead to her PhD combining both Psychology and Pharmacy. She’s a massive lover of Britney Spears and speaks fluent Welsh, how cool is that?!

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Tell us a little more about your research

My research explores how and why procedures are bypassed or deviated from in community pharmacy. In my PhD I conducted 13 focus groups to understand what the prevailing safety culture looks like in pharmacies. I then interviewed pharmacy frontline staff to ask them about specific instances of where they had bypassed or deviated from procedures and their reasons for doing so. Finally, I created a questionnaire based on a novel psychological theory to further understand the behavioural drivers for bypassing or deviating from procedures on a larger scale. In 2016 I had a paper published which was a huge milestone for me.

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Day in the life of Chrissy

So why a blog on mindfulness?

I’m a psychologist by background, I was fascinated by how the human mind works. However, the reason I got into mindfulness was because I was suffering from health anxiety a few years ago, following an asthma diagnosis. The constant anxious thoughts of “what if I have an asthma attack?” were completely exhausting. In an effort to become less anxious I looked into meditation and was astounded by it! I had a few seconds of complete silence in my mind. It was such a relief after the constant chatter of anxious thoughts. Since then I’ve tried to bring mindfulness into my daily life as it helps me to stay present rather than worrying about a future event that might never happen. I therefore love writing about practical ways to use mindfulness. I also wrote a few posts about what it felt like to be at certain stages of my PhD. PhDs can be isolating, so to hear people say that they felt the same way too was really comforting.

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How can we be more mindful?

When you find your mind wandering come back to your senses. What can you hear right now? What can you see? This helps to ground us in the present and to experience life as it is happening. Often our daily tasks like having a shower and driving to work can be done on autopilot. Commit to noticing what it feels like to do these tasks. Appreciate the moment and find joy in the mundane everyday tasks. This small change can lead to a big difference, and help to stop the feeling that life is passing you by.

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Maintaining a work-life balance is vital. How do you balance the two?

I love spending time with my family and friends, and I always make sure that I have something to look forward to in my diary. It helps me to schedule my time and motivates me to complete tasks so that I can really enjoy my down time without worrying about work.

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Graduating from her PhD at The University of Manchester

I see you’re passionate about inspiring young girls?

My mum always told me that I could do anything that I put my mind to, and I am passionate about inspiring girls to live the life that they want rather than the life that they think they should have just because they’re a girl. In an effort to instil confidence in young people I have visited schools and presented to young women about believing in their potential. I have also been interviewed for Women in Science where I talk about how I felt during my career so far – the fears, the doubts, and the lows. With social media, things can look incredibly rosy from the outside. It’s important to show that we are all human and we all struggle sometimes.

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A big part of my blog is to dish out PhD SOS tips. What are your dos and don’ts?!

Don’t let feeling like a fraud stop you. I would bet that everyone doing a PhD feels like an imposter at some point (check out Hugh Kearns’ work on imposter syndrome). It’s something many PhD students experience, so talk about it and look for all of the evidence that exists to show that you are worthy of being exactly where you are.

Do a PhD in a topic that you are genuinely passionate about. The years spent studying for my PhD were three of my favourite years of my life so far! I have no doubt that this was because I believed in my project, I could see the potential that the project had for making a positive difference in practice, that was what motivated me during the hard times.

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Thank you so much to Chrissy for being my first feature and taking the time to be interviewed! Please check out her amazing blog at Making it Mindful. She also shares mindful and inspiring quotes and posts on her @makingitmindful Instagram and Twitter accounts, so be sure to give her a follow!

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Every month I’ll be showcasing another scientist so stay tuned to learn about more incredible people!

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